Satellites Could Detect Rogue Nuclear Tests (07/12/2012)

SAN FRANCISCO — A new technique using GPS and large radio telescopes can detect clandestine underground nuclear tests using waves that travel from the blast into the upper atmosphere, or ionosphere, new research suggests.

Super-Efficient Solar-Energy Technology: ‘Solar Steam’ So Effective It Can Make Steam from Icy Cold Water (20/11/2012)

Rice University scientists have unveiled a revolutionary new technology that uses nanoparticles to convert solar energy directly into steam. The new "solar steam" method from Rice's Laboratory for Nanophotonics is so effective it can even produce steam from icy cold water. The technology's inventors said they expect it will first be used in sanitation and water-purification applications in the developing world.

Medical Vital-Sign Monitoring Reduced to the Size of a Postage Stamp (19/11/2012)

Electrical engineers at Oregon State University have developed new technology to monitor medical vital signs, with sophisticated sensors so small and cheap they could fit onto a bandage, be manufactured in high volumes and cost less than a quarter.

Using Rust and Water to Store Solar Energy as Hydrogen (12/11/2012)

How can solar energy be stored so that it can be available any time, day or night, when the sun shining or not? EPFL scientists are developing a technology that can transform light energy into a clean fuel that has a neutral carbon footprint: hydrogen. The basic ingredients of the recipe are water and metal oxides, such as iron oxide, better known as rust. Kevin Sivula and his colleagues purposefully limited themselves to inexpensive materials and easily scalable production processes in order to enable an economically viable method for solar hydrogen production. The device, still in the experimental stages, is described in an article published in the journal Nature Photonics.

Laser the Size of a Virus Particle: Miniature Laser Operates at Room Temperature and Defies the Diffraction Limit of Light (07/11/2012)

A Northwestern University research team has found a way to manufacture single laser devices that are the size of a virus particle and that operate at room temperature. These plasmonic nanolasers could be readily integrated into silicon-based photonic devices, all-optical circuits and nanoscale biosensors.

Government faces possible legal action (06/11/2012)

A nursery forced to destroy 50,000 ash trees after a fungal disease was found is considering taking legal action against the government for failing to block imports sooner.

Scientists Build the First All-Carbon Solar Cell (01/11/2012)

Stanford University scientists have built the first solar cell made entirely of carbon, a promising alternative to the expensive materials used in photovoltaic devices today.

Intel working on 48-core chip for smartphones, tablets (31/10/2012)

Intel researchers are working on a 48-core processor for smartphones and tablets but it could be five to 10 years before it hits the market.

“If we’re going to have this technology in five to 10 years, we could finally do things that take way too much processing power today,” said Patrick Moorhead, an analyst with Moor Insights and Strategy. “This could really open up our concept of what is a computer… The phone would be smart enough to not just be a computer but it could be my computer.”

Milky Way's Black Hole Getting Ready for Snack (23/10/2012)

Get ready for a fascinating eating experience in the center of our galaxy. The event involves a black hole that may devour much of an approaching cloud of dust and gas known as G2.

Inside the internet: Google allows first ever look at the eight vast data centres that power the online world (23/10/2012)

Google has given a rare glimpse inside the vast data centres around the globe that power its services.

They reveal an intricate maze of computers that process Internet search requests, show YouTube video clips and distribute email for millions of people.

With hundreds of thousands of servers, colourful cables and even bicycles so engineers can get around quickly, they range from a converted paper mill in Finland to custom made server farms in Iowa.