DPM inspects Mekong Delta landslides
30/05/2017
Deputy PM Trinh Dinh Dung inspected landslides, coastal erosion, and forest degradation at Khanh Tien commune, U Minh district, southernmost Ca Mau province

 

Deputy PM Trinh Dinh Dung (4thfrom R) inspects landslides, coastal erosion, and forest degradation at Khanh Tien commune, U Minh district, southernmost Ca Mau province, May 29, 2017 - Photo: VGP/Xuan Tuyen

The Government leader was accompanied by Minister of Natural Resources and Environment Tran Hong Ha, leaders of the Ministries of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD), Transport, the Office of the Government, and Ca Mau province.

The  MARD reported that seashore erosion and forest degradation in Mekong Delta provinces have occurred complicatedly and were on the rise at large scale. In some areas, the natural disasters seriously affected lives of local residents, infrastructure, and ecological environment.

The region has 24 areas which are regularly and hardly hit by erosion with a total length of 147 kilometers at an average rate of 5-45 meters per year.  

Over the past time, the Government and the National Committee on Climate Change have issued a series of programs, projects, research projects to develop infrastructure and strengthen resilience capacity in response to climate change.

In the 2011-2015 period, about VND 59 trillion or 32.7% of public investment was spent on transport development.  About 18.5% was given on irrigation upgrading. In the 2016-2020 period, the region was expected to get VND 21 trillion or 28% for irrigation development. Inter-regional transport projects will also be built.

Earlier, in the 2012-2015 period, the region absorbed VND 1,438 billion out of VND 3,232 billion (or 44.4% of the whole country). In the 2016-2020 period, the region will receive VND 4,400 billion or about 40%.

Scientific experts attributed seven causes for coastal landslides and erosion, especially the unbalanced sand and mud due to construction of reservoirs  in upper reach rivers, sand and gravel mining in river-beds; weak geology in the region; and afforestration for aquaculture cultivation and fishing.

The MARD also stressed that the construction of houses and projects in coastal areas and dykes also led to serious landslides.

In addition, sea level rise at an average of 2-3 millimeters per year also made the problem get worse./.

Deputy PM Trinh Dinh Dung (4thfrom R) inspects landslides, coastal erosion, and forest degradation at Khanh Tien commune, U Minh district, southernmost Ca Mau province, May 29, 2017 - Photo: VGP/Xuan Tuyen

The Government leader was accompanied by Minister of Natural Resources and Environment Tran Hong Ha, leaders of the Ministries of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD), Transport, the Office of the Government, and Ca Mau province.

The  MARD reported that seashore erosion and forest degradation in Mekong Delta provinces have occurred complicatedly and were on the rise at large scale. In some areas, the natural disasters seriously affected lives of local residents, infrastructure, and ecological environment.

The region has 24 areas which are regularly and hardly hit by erosion with a total length of 147 kilometers at an average rate of 5-45 meters per year.  

Over the past time, the Government and the National Committee on Climate Change have issued a series of programs, projects, research projects to develop infrastructure and strengthen resilience capacity in response to climate change.

In the 2011-2015 period, about VND 59 trillion or 32.7% of public investment was spent on transport development.  About 18.5% was given on irrigation upgrading. In the 2016-2020 period, the region was expected to get VND 21 trillion or 28% for irrigation development. Inter-regional transport projects will also be built.

Earlier, in the 2012-2015 period, the region absorbed VND 1,438 billion out of VND 3,232 billion (or 44.4% of the whole country). In the 2016-2020 period, the region will receive VND 4,400 billion or about 40%.

Scientific experts attributed seven causes for coastal landslides and erosion, especially the unbalanced sand and mud due to construction of reservoirs  in upper reach rivers, sand and gravel mining in river-beds; weak geology in the region; and afforestration for aquaculture cultivation and fishing.

The MARD also stressed that the construction of houses and projects in coastal areas and dykes also led to serious landslides.

In addition, sea level rise at an average of 2-3 millimeters per year also made the problem get worse./.


Other news